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  • simplicity – access relies only on mainstream web "redirects" and ordinary "get" requests
  • versatility utility – with "inflections" (different endings), an ARK should access data, metadata, promises, and more
  • versatility – inflections don't conflict with "linked data content negotiation" (a harder way to access metadata) 
  • transparency – no identifier can guarantee stability, and ARK inflections help users make informed judgements
  • visibility – syntax rules make ARKs easy to extract from texts and to compare for variant and containment relationships
  • openness – unlike other persistent identifiers, ARKs don't lock you into one specific, fee-based management and resolution infrastructure 
  • impact – ARKs (and DOIs) appear in Thomson Reuters’ Data Citation Index℠

In the last fourteen years over 395 organizations spread across fifteen countries registered to assign ARKs.  Registrants include libraries, archives, museums (Smithsonian), publishers (PeerJ), government agencies (EPA), academic institutions (Princeton), and technology companies (Google). Some of the major users are

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Because long-term identifiers often look like random strings of letters and digits, organizations typically use software to generate (or mint, in ARK parlance) and track identifiers. To mint ARKs, you may use any software that can produce identifiers conforming to the ARK specification. CDL uses the open-source open source Noid (nice opaque identifiers, rhymes with "employed") software, which creates minters and accepts commands that operate them. The noid software documentation explains how to use noid not only to mint identifiers but also to serve as an institution's "identifier resolver".

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